The tragedy of hunting wildlife for sport

A few years back, one of the most famous lions in history, Cecil, was gunned down by a trophy hunter, sparking global outrage the likes of which the world has never seen before. While several groups have been decrying the hunting of wildlife for sport, it wasn’t until Cecil’s death that people started to open their eyes at the cruelty and inhumanity of it all. Tatiana Regan.

While people may defend this by saying that hunting animals for sport has been practiced way before guns were even invented, that still doesn’t mean it’s right to do so. There are many reasons to hunt animals. Food and safety are two of the most reasonable ones. Fun, however, will never fit in any category.

The sad truth about trophy hunting is that it is practiced by thousands of individuals who are protected by laws that make the “sport” legal. According to reports, over 100 million animals all over the world are killed by trophy hunters every year. This number doesn’t even account for animals killed in places that aren’t protected by the state. Tatiana Regan.

While some places may argue that they practice population control of these animals to ensure the survival of the species, or that killing animals straight out is a humane way of putting them down, these reasons are still skewed from the plain and simple point – that the killing of animals for any reason other than food or safety is unacceptable.

And often misunderstood by most trophy hunters – every living thing on the planet is connected. If things were the other way around, and people were hunted for sport by some higher life form, it wouldn’t be fun now, would it? Tatiana Regan.

Tags: Animal Rights, Animal Welfare, Hunting, Trophy Hunting

References:

Why Sport Hunting Is Cruel and Unnecessary

5 Reasons Trophy Hunting is not Conservation


http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/19/opinions/trophy-hunting-not-conservation-flocken/

Images:
http://assets.worldwildlife.org/photos/2340/images/story_full_width/SCR_47714.jpg?1346163788
Image source: worldwildlife.org



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